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Maritime Industry News 2016: The Year in Review

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Kemplon Engineering looks back at the whirlwind year that was 2016 – which was, for all its strokes of bad luck and bold brilliance, certainly a year for the history books. Here are a few of the news and major issues that grabbed maritime industry headlines over the last twelve months:

Image “Old Clock” courtesy of Witthaya Phonsawat at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS.2016 had started off with a proverbial bang, with January seeing the apprehension of American sailors who had inadvertently strayed into Iranian territorial waters. The situation was rapidly diffused amid improvements in U.S. – Iran relations.

Diplomacy is not faring very well on the other side of the world too, with China’s Territorial Ambitions running afoul of its neighbors’ economic and sovereign interests. Just like the previous years (territorial disputes in Asia is no stranger to our Year in Review lists), rightful ownership of small islands is contested by various country claimants, with incredible stakes – national pride, for one, but also exclusive economic zones for fishing, control over crucial shipping routes, strategic military outposts, and a potential wealth in untapped natural resource deposits.Far less rosy is the picture of United States – Russia relations. The tumultuous year saw a number of tense, Cold War era-type interactions between the two superpowers, among them a June encounter between Russian Navy frigate Yaroslav Mudry and the United States’ USS Gravely and USS Harry S. Truman, on top of failed efforts to cooperate and help end the civil war in Syria. 2016 ends with sanctions and the expulsion of Russian diplomats, amid allegations of interference in the United States’ November elections. This situation is still developing.

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The New Chief of Naval Operations: Admiral John Richardson

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One of the most important posts in national defense, international relations and maritime security changed hands this September, with Admiral John Richardson relieving Admiral Jonathan W. Greenert as the new U.S. Chief of Naval Operations.

The US Chief of Naval Operations is the most senior officer in the Navy. As such, the CNO is a member of the Joints Chiefs of Staff, serving as advisor to no less than the Secretary of the Navy, the Secretary of Defense, and yes, even the President himself. Read More

The 70th Anniversary of End of World War II

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Across the United States, programs commemorate the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II.

World War II. Human history’s deadliest war involved over 30 countries and caused 50 (some say 85) million deaths. Coming just a few years after World War I (previously known as “The Great War” which had destabilized much of Europe), World War II emerged from unresolved issues, including German resentment over the Versailles Treaty, which would ultimately lead to the rise of Adolf Hitler and his Nazi Party. For a time, German rearmament and aggression went unchecked, until the invasion of Poland prompted France and Britain to declare war against Germany, in accordance with their military commitments. Read More

EU Migrant Crisis: Life and Death on Europe’s Waters

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The refugee and migrant crisis engulfing Europe is one of the most important and complex issues of our time. Over the last few weeks, two news items bring home the humanity of the overwhelming situation: a birth – and the death of a child – at sea.

 For the past few months, Kemplon Engineering has been following Europe’s escalating refugee and migrant crisis on our blog (see related articles, “Europe’s Migrant ‘Ghost’ Ships;” “A Cruise Ship for Refugee Aid in Greece;” and “EU To Spend More On Mediterranean Search and Rescue Ops”). Read More

Monthly Maritime News Roundup: August, 2015

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Kemplon Engineering rounds up some of the most buzzed-about news and developments of August, 2015 in this edition of the Monthly Maritime News Roundup:

Egypt figured heavily in the news cycles this month, following early August’s launching of an Expansion to the Suez Canal. The inauguration was hosted by President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi and attended by foreign dignitaries. The project has its critics, but proponents hope the $8.2 billion project could bring in more shipping traffic and revenues to the canal, which is already the shortest connection between Asia and Europe. The expansion had involved deepening the main waterway and carving out a parallel, 35km-channel, taking 12 months to complete. Read More

World Watches As Russia Celebrates Navy Day

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On Russia’s Navy Day, the European superpower had the world’s attention over the weekend with their flashy presentations and bold announcements.

Russia’s Navy Day is an annual celebration commemorating the victories of the country’s sailors, and honoring servicemen connected to the sea. It is celebrated on the last Sunday of the month of July. This year, it was held at various port cities across the country on the 26th, with displays of Russian military might. On parade were the Baltic, Black Sea, Pacific and Northern fleets as well as the Caspian Flotilla, and on high display were presentations by troops on vessels like ships, submarines and aircraft.

The Sevastopol Port was notably impressive, reportedly showing off as many as 20 ships and 35 aircraft. St. Petersburg was flashy too, with 10 ships including submarine Vyborg and anti-submarine vessel Urengoy. In the city of Baltiysk in Kaliningrad, a highlight was Russian president Vladimir Putin’s presence and the commissioning of new spy ship, Yury Ivanov.

The flashy festivities is in line with Russia’s focus on rebuilding and modernizing their military. By the end of this year, their Navy is expected to receive 10 warships and more than 40 support vessels as part of a $325 billion program that seeks to modernize 70% of the Russian military in the next few years.

The weekend was eventful for another reason. Just ahead of their Navy Day, Russia released changes to its Naval Doctrine. Among strategies and priorities outlined in the new maritime doctrine are amendments relating to maintaining a presence in the Atlantic and Mediterranean; boosting presence in the Crimea and in the Arctic; and social provisions like medicine and health building for the naval sector. President Putin approved the changes in Baltyisk, and had referred to the amendments as a milestone for the Navy’s future.

Unfortunately, the new doctrine is also marked by tensions reminiscent of the Cold War. It is critical of NATO expansion activities that the country perceives as “inadmissible,” and is reflective of a deteriorating relationship with the West.

If international maritime affairs interest you, this is just one of the many maritime industry-related topics we follow on our frequently-updated blog, which you may enjoy perusing.

Having served the marine and industrial communities for a decade now, we at Kemplon Engineering are dedicated to customer satisfaction – from the engineering services we provide to the industry-related news we share. If you have an engineering project in mind or an engineering problem you need solutions for, check out our website and see what Kemplon Engineering can do for you. We have a wide range of capabilities, including welding and fabrication, precision machining, pipe fitting, laser cutting, and more. Our team is eager to hear from you. Contact us for queries and quotes at info@kemplon.com, or by phone at (877) 522-6526.

 

References

Calderwood, Imogen. “What did they Putin that missile? Russian Navy Day celebrations nosedive when weapons launch from warship flops into the sea.” Mail Online, 27 Jul 2015. Web. 03 Aug 2015. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3175806/What-did-Putin-missile-Russian-Navy-Day-celebrations-nosedive-weapons-launch-warship-flops-sea.html

Chastain, Mary. “NEW DOCTRINE ESTABLISHES STRONG RUSSIAN PRESENCE IN ATLANTIC OCEAN.” Breitbart, 26 Jul 2015. Web. 03 Aug 2015. http://www.breitbart.com/national-security/2015/07/26/new-doctrine-establishes-strong-russian-presence-in-atlantic-ocean/

Laursen, Wendy. “Moscow Launches New Strategy, New Ship.” The Maritime Executive, 26 Jul 2015. Web. 03 Aug 2015. http://maritime-executive.com/article/moscow-launches-new-strategy-new-ship

“Russia Revises Navy Doctrine.” Defense News, 26 Jul 2015. Web. 03 Aug 2015. http://www.defensenews.com/story/defense/international/europe/2015/07/26/russia-revises-navy-doctrine/30705553/

“Russia revises navy doctrine over NATO’s ‘inadmissible’ expansion.” Yahoo! News, 26 Jul 2015. Web. 03 Aug 2015. http://news.yahoo.com/russia-revises-navy-doctrine-over-natos-inadmissible-expansion-191235893.html

“Russia’s Black Sea Fleet Gets Significant Boost for First Time After Pause.” Sputnik, 26 Jul 2015. Web. 03 Aug 2015. http://sputniknews.com/russia/20150726/1025053147.html

“Russia’s new maritime doctrine ‘to counter NATO’s expansion’, focuses on Crimea & Arctic.” RT.com, 26 Jul 2015. Web. 03 Aug 2015. https://www.rt.com/news/310802-russia-maritime-doctrine-nato/