Marine Environment Archives - Kemplon Engineering

How Ports in Florida are Propelling its Economy

By | Article, Marine News | No Comments

Economic Sunshine in the Sunshine State

Between 2012 and 2016, the fifteen major ports of Florida added 200,000 jobs and handled 7.9 million tons more cargo. And at $117.6 billion, the economic operations of these ports contribute 13.35% of the state’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

Ports of Florida
Image Courtesy of Google Maps at 1

 

These are some of the observations recorded in the study The Statewide Economic Impacts of Florida Seaports authored by the Florida Ports Council. Impressive figures these! And by the looks of it, sunny economic weather is here to stay in Florida.

Governor of Florida, Rick Scott celebrated some of these achievements on December 13 this year at Port Tampa Bay, the port that commissioned two cranes capable of dealing with post-Panamax ships.

Over the last five years, the state has invested $1 billion in its ports. The investment has started bearing fruit and the results are no less than spectacular. These achievements are only the beginning.

Governor Scott has set his sights much higher. He wants these ports and the vibrant economic activity they inspire to make Florida a gateway to Latin America given the fact that the Panama Canal has just been expanded to support larger ships.

Read More

Maritime Industry News 2016: The Year in Review

By | Article, Marine News | No Comments

Kemplon Engineering looks back at the whirlwind year that was 2016 – which was, for all its strokes of bad luck and bold brilliance, certainly a year for the history books. Here are a few of the news and major issues that grabbed maritime industry headlines over the last twelve months:

Image “Old Clock” courtesy of Witthaya Phonsawat at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS.2016 had started off with a proverbial bang, with January seeing the apprehension of American sailors who had inadvertently strayed into Iranian territorial waters. The situation was rapidly diffused amid improvements in U.S. – Iran relations.

Diplomacy is not faring very well on the other side of the world too, with China’s Territorial Ambitions running afoul of its neighbors’ economic and sovereign interests. Just like the previous years (territorial disputes in Asia is no stranger to our Year in Review lists), rightful ownership of small islands is contested by various country claimants, with incredible stakes – national pride, for one, but also exclusive economic zones for fishing, control over crucial shipping routes, strategic military outposts, and a potential wealth in untapped natural resource deposits.Far less rosy is the picture of United States – Russia relations. The tumultuous year saw a number of tense, Cold War era-type interactions between the two superpowers, among them a June encounter between Russian Navy frigate Yaroslav Mudry and the United States’ USS Gravely and USS Harry S. Truman, on top of failed efforts to cooperate and help end the civil war in Syria. 2016 ends with sanctions and the expulsion of Russian diplomats, amid allegations of interference in the United States’ November elections. This situation is still developing.

Read More

Monthly Maritime News Roundup: November, 2016

By | Article, Marine News | No Comments

^ Image “News Map Shows Worldwide Journalism Or Media Information” courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

November, 2016 may have already come and gone, but this month’s dramatic events signal changes that have just begun. Kemplon Engineering takes a look back at some of the industry’s major news and developments, in this edition of the Monthly Maritime News Roundup:

November kicked off with the surprise victory of Donal Trump as president-elect of the United States of America. With his campaign promises slanted toward protectionism – championing local manufacturing, railing against the outsourcing of jobs to cheaper foreign markets, criticizing international trade agreements like the NAFTA, calling for China to be labeled as a currency manipulator, etc. – there may be some uncertainties on the horizon for the maritime industry, notably with shipping which is impacted by trade, as well as in defense which is impacted by foreign policy. Read More

Monthly Maritime News Roundup: October, 2016

By | Article, Events, Marine News | No Comments

^ Image “News Dice Show Coverage Of Current Events” courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

October might be known for festive frights, but a number of events in the maritime industry gave us some real world scares. Hurricane Matthew kicked off the month, weaving its way from the Caribbean to the Southeastern United States. Its destructive path ushered in 100 mph winds, storm surges as high as 9 feet, with rainfall and flooding. The price tag for damages is estimated to be in the billions of dollars. Read More

Monthly Maritime News Roundup: October, 2015

By | Article, Marine News, Technology | No Comments

One month goes by so quickly in the ever-dynamic maritime industry, and yet the days are packed with so many news and developments! Here is a lookback at a few of the topics gracing media headlines this October, 2015:

Hurricane Joaquin swept through parts of the United States, bearing winds, waves and flooding, and leaving damages to both land and sea. Tragically, it also took the lives of 33 crew aboard RO/RO cargo ship El Faro, hit by harsh weather en route from Florida to Puerto Rico (see related article, “Search and Rescue Ops After Hurricane Joaquin”). Since the loss of the vessel and presumed loss of its crew, the NTSB has released a preliminary report on the ensuing investigation; salvage and diving teams from the Navy have been contracted to search for the missing ship; a relief fund has been established for the family by the ship owners; and lawsuits – one to the tune of $100 million – have been filed on behalf of the grieving families.

Read More

Shell Pulls Out of Arctic Exploration

By | Article, Marine News, Technology | No Comments

The Arctic gamble isn’t quite working out as expected for Shell. Lured in by the same optimism and promise of untapped natural resources that has captivated many other international players in government, business and the maritime industry, the company has shelled out billions of dollars and faced down negative public opinion and confrontational environmental groups to fight for its place in the region. But late this September, their Arctic adventure comes to an end, with the announcement that they would be ceasing oil exploration activities for the foreseeable future. Read More